MLB needs to change its All-Star voting

All-Star voting
May 11, 2016; Denver, CO, USA; Colorado Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado (28) talks with shortstop Trevor Story (27) in the fourth inning against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Coors Field. Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports

Nolan Arenado is arguably the best third basemen in the major leagues and yet he isn’t leading his position in votes when it comes to the All-Star game.

Arenado is leading the NL in home runs and RBIs and is hitting .289, but Kris Bryant, the Chicago Cubs third basemen, is currently leading by more than 300,000 votes, and that’s only a testament to the Cubs’ popularity compared to the Rockies.

The Cubs are by far the more popular team and because of their recent success, and many experts calling them favorites to win the World Series for the first time since 1908, the Cubs are the most popular team in baseball at the moment. That is no excuse for all star voting, though.

In the National League, the Cubs own five of the nine starting positions and have a player in the top five for all nine. Bryant at third base, Addison Russell at short, Ben Zobrist at second, Anthony Rizzo at first and Dexter Fowler in the outfield all lead their positions in voting.

Daniel Murphy, the second basemen for the Washington Nationals — who is also an early season candidate to win the MVP — is hitting an MLB best .367 with 11 home runs and has an OPS of 1.012, which also leads the majors. He is second in voting behind Ben Zobrist. Zobrist is hitting .319 with eight home runs and has an OPS of .919.

Trevor Story, the rookie of the month in April and shortstop for the Rockies, broke onto the scene hitting 10 home runs in his first month in the majors, which set a rookie record. He is putting up better numbers but is more than 100,000 votes away from Addison Russell, the Cubs shortstop. Russell is only hitting .234 with five home runs.

Last year, the Kansas City Royals had almost eight positions filled because their fans voted over and over again for players who actually deserved to be in the All Star game, like Eric Hosmer and Lorenzo Cain, and then others who probably shouldn’t have even been considered by the MLB to be allowed in the game, like Omar Infante and Alex Rios to name some of the few.

This season, the Royals are once again making a strong push to have more than six position players on the field in one of the most important games of the year.

Omar Infante, Alcides Escobar, Mike Moustakas and Kendrys Morales are all in second place at their respective positions, while Cain, Hosmer, and Salvador Perez lead their positions, deservable.

Moustakas is injured, Morales is hitting .204 with seven home runs, Infante is hitting .239 with zero home runs, and Escobar is hitting .244 with (yes) zero home runs. The other three are definitely all stars, but this has to stop.

Fans from other teams have been voicing their concerns, disbeliefs, and displeasures with Royals fans on social media.

Major League Baseball has to stop this nonsense. Allowing fans from certain teams to vote an unlimited amount of times is unfair. Not every player from every team should be available to vote for, and the league should use “common sense” when it comes to the players they allow to be voted for.

Of course, fans should be able to vote for players like Bryant and Zobrist who deserve to be there, but if there is someone who is having a considerably better season and everyone knows it, then the league should step in and allow for players like Bryant and Zobrist to come off the bench and insert players like Arenado and Murphy into the starting lineup.

It’s not even close when it comes to Murphy and Zobrist.

The fact that an average player in Omar Infante is less than 200,000 votes away from arguably the MVP of the American League, Jose Altuve, is ridiculous and unjust. He is even above Robinson Cano, who is having a better year in every statistical category than Infante.

Some fan bases will vote more than others and voice their support by casting the most votes for the majority of their team, but if players who don’t deserve to start, let alone even be in the actual game, end up racking up the most votes, what does the MLB do next?

This is the most-important All-Star game in any sport, considering it determines home field advantage in the World Series, and the league can’t afford to have mediocre players who have not earned their spot in the game playing in it.

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